9/11-STYLE ATTACK #North Korea #cyberwar targets #US aerospace amid fears of #HACKED #planes

THE US Government has admitted that North Korea has targeted its aerospace industry in a shock revelation – amid growing fears that enemy states could hack into planes mid-flight to cause a devastating attack.

The US Government issued an alert this week that recent cyber attacks from the North Korean regime have targeted its aerospace, telecommunications and financial industries.

This comes after the US Department of Homeland Security admitted that hackers could now “take control” of a passenger jet mid-flight following a classified test by the US Government.

American security services are scrambling to keep this top-level information on how exactly to hack into planes secret and out of the hands of their enemies.

Cyberterrorism analyst Morgan Wright said that a “9/11-style attack” was possible without any hijackers on board the flight.

Speaking to Fox News, the former senior state department advisor said the aerospace industry has known about these weaknesses for years.

He added that experts had no idea how many planes were vulnerable to such an attack, but he acknowledged that terrorists could make “a plane go down”.

Information about the extent of the shocking test which hacked into a commercial plane has been placed under extreme restrictions.

Despite this, Robert Hickey, a representative for the DHS, revealed that “hacking the plane was swift and relatively simple, it involved typical stuff you could get through security”.

He also estimated that around 90 per cent of commercial planes lacked adequate protection.

Experts told the Daily Beast that the “typical stuff” Mr Hickey referred to amounted to £15 worth of technology.

On top of this, the FBI revealed this week that the US government’s aerospace security has been hacked by Kim Jong-Un’s regime, amid fears of an all-out war between the two countries.

North Korea’s powerful army of cyberhackers has largely been overshadowed by the war of words between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-Un.

Last year it was claimed that hackers could access plane controls while in-flight on several major airlines, including Emirates, Virgin and Qatar airlines through the Panasonic Avionics in-flight system, according to cybersecurity researchers at IOActive.

However, Panasonic denied these claims.