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After 47 Years, the National Weather Service’s Daily TV Broadcast To Alaskans Will End | #childpredator | #onlinepredator | #sextrafficing


“Alaska Weather,” a daily 30-minute TV show that has broadcast across Alaska for the past 47 years, is going off the air due to a lack of funds. Gizmodo reports: In lieu of the news, residents seeking information on their state’s weather will be forced to lean on spotty, sub-par internet. Friday evening will be the final television installment of “Alaska Weather,” as first reported by Alaska Public Media. The show, which is the only weather program produced directly by the National Weather Service, has filled an information and communications void for decades. Without it, “if you don’t have good internet connectivity, you’re in a world of hurt in western and northern Alaska as far as getting weather information,” said Rick Thoman, a climate specialist at the International Arctic Research Center, to the Associated Press. And many in Alaska don’t have reliable or fast internet access.

General, aviation, and maritime forecast segments will remain available online only, via YouTube. Emergency alerts, like storm warnings, will be relegated to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration radio broadcasts, which don’t cover the whole state, per Alaska Public Media. Officials from the state-owned, non-profit media organization say that money problems are to blame. Putting together and distributing “Alaska Weather” has cost Alaska Public Media $200,000 annually, and the network can’t afford to do it anymore, according to Linda Wei, APM’s chief content officer.

“It’s no longer sustainable for us to continue in this manner,” Wei told AP. “It’s not a decision that we came to lightly.” Big state funding cuts in 2019 left APM in a tough spot. The media org kept “Alaska Weather” going on its own for years, following the loss of state backing, but now Wei says the network can’t anymore. “We’ve been doing this, without support, for about four or five years, and we’ve made that known to NOAA,” said Wei to WaPo. “It just got to the point where we couldn’t continue.” Wei says she’s hoping there’s a possibility of getting “Alaska Weather” back on the air. But for now, there will be a gap.



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