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Bill banning child molester pardons, heads to Governor’s desk | #childpredator | #kidsaftey | #childsaftey


It has been eight years since Jay Strickland stood in a Jefferson County courtroom to plead guilty to sexually assaulting a minor.The case still haunts his victim, Aaron Nette.“So, he was my stepfather. He was a youth pastor. He was a nurse anesthetist and an Army veteran. So, all of these things that you know, you feel like you can trust,” Nette said.Nette claimed the abuse started when he was only eight and continued into his teen years.“I don’t really get into the specifics of it, but if you can just imagine the worst type of abuse that can be done, that is what happened,” Nette said.The Morris native decided to come forward in 2014, leading to a 2016 guilty plea for sodomy.Strickland received three years of probation.Then, last fall he asked for a pardon, which would have dropped his registered sex offender status. Even though Nette fought the pardon and won, he faced the same battle in the future.“So, I really didn’t want to have to go through the process of every two years seeing my abuser again,” Nette said.He teamed up with Alabama Rep. Allen Treadaway to write House Bill 81. Known as Aaron’s law, it would prevent child sex offenders from ever receiving a pardon.After passing unanimously in the House in March, senators approved it 35-0 Tuesday night.Its final passage gave Nette, now a U.S. Navy Lieutenant and married father, a special peace of mind.“I am very, very relieved, very excited, because this now puts the power back into the hands of survivors of these crimes. And gives survivors throughout the state their voice again,” Nette said.Gov. Kay Ivey is expected to sign Aaron’s Law during a special ceremony next Wednesday in Montgomery.

It has been eight years since Jay Strickland stood in a Jefferson County courtroom to plead guilty to sexually assaulting a minor.

The case still haunts his victim, Aaron Nette.

“So, he was my stepfather. He was a youth pastor. He was a nurse anesthetist and an Army veteran. So, all of these things that you know, you feel like you can trust,” Nette said.

Nette claimed the abuse started when he was only eight and continued into his teen years.

“I don’t really get into the specifics of it, but if you can just imagine the worst type of abuse that can be done, that is what happened,” Nette said.

The Morris native decided to come forward in 2014, leading to a 2016 guilty plea for sodomy.

Strickland received three years of probation.

Then, last fall he asked for a pardon, which would have dropped his registered sex offender status.

Even though Nette fought the pardon and won, he faced the same battle in the future.

“So, I really didn’t want to have to go through the process of every two years seeing my abuser again,” Nette said.

He teamed up with Alabama Rep. Allen Treadaway to write House Bill 81. Known as Aaron’s law, it would prevent child sex offenders from ever receiving a pardon.

After passing unanimously in the House in March, senators approved it 35-0 Tuesday night.

Its final passage gave Nette, now a U.S. Navy Lieutenant and married father, a special peace of mind.

“I am very, very relieved, very excited, because this now puts the power back into the hands of survivors of these crimes. And gives survivors throughout the state their voice again,” Nette said.

Gov. Kay Ivey is expected to sign Aaron’s Law during a special ceremony next Wednesday in Montgomery.



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