Book Review: Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security


***** Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security. By Daniel J. Solove. Yale University Press, yalepress.yale.edu; 256 pages; $25.

Incidents that raise questions about online security and privacy rights are a common occurrence. Books about these issues are equally plentiful, but none that I have seen addresses the issue in more detail or with greater insight than this work by Daniel Solove, a professor at George Washington University’s Law School.

In Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security, Sol­ove expands on his previous work to examine how developments in technology have enhanced the ability of government and others who can afford it to track what we do, where we go, and other facets of our daily life—all in the name of enhanced security. In an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand book, Solove concisely reveals the fallacies of many security arguments that justify intrusions into our lives. He also provides cogent examples of how the security-privacy balance can be properly restored.

(To continue reading this review from our March 2012 issue, please click here)

Other links you may like:

Check out Gregory Evans on Entertainment Tonight http://www.youtube.com/no1hacker#p/u/1/t0Jyf3cWqoA, LocatePC, Fake Emails go to SPOOFEM.COM, LIGATT Security, Hacker Gear OnlineStolen Computer Alert

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