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Clever iPhone hack is essential if you’re hoping for snow on Christmas Day | #hacking | #cybersecurity | #infosec | #comptia | #pentest | #hacker


ANYONE hoping for a white Christmas will want to make sure their iPhone is set up to be snow-ready.

There are some clever hacks built into the Apple Weather app that you need to know about.

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The Weather app can also give you a timeline of precipitation overlaid on a mapCredit: Apple

It means you can make sure you have the best view of when the snow is coming.

And you can even get snow alerts so that you can be outside waiting for the first flakes to fall.

First, you’ll need to make sure you’re at least using a fairly recent version of Apple’s iPhone software: iOS 15.

Head to Settings > General > Software Update and make sure there’s nothing you need to install. If you’re fully up to date, you’ll be on a version of iOS 16.

Now launch the Weather app, which is on your iPhone by default.

It’s a blue app with an image of the sun peeking out from behind a cloud.

Go into the app and tap the map icon in the bottom-left corner.

Then tap the three squares stacked on top of each other in the top right.

Choose Precipitation and you’ll be able to see a rolling forecast of snow and rain as it moves around you.

You can also zoom in or out for a better view.

When snow is imminent, you’ll see an icon in the middle of the map over your location.

This will flag incoming snow, and how far it is away.

Of course, you can also shift through the timeline to see how precipitation is moving around where you live.

You can use the bar along the bottom of the screen to move through time.

And if that’s disappeared, just tap the screen to bring it back.

This will give you a very clear idea of where the snow will fall.

And based on the colours of the precipitation (per the chart on the left), you’ll be able to see if it’s heavy or light flurries.

Of course, this is all predictive so the map might not be exactly right – but that’s always the case with the weather.

If you’re really interesting in the snow, you can even get your iPhone to warn you just as it’s about to start falling.

How to enable weather alerts on your iPhone

First, make sure you’re updated to iOS 15 – go to Settings > General > Software Update.

Then grant the Weather app your location info, otherwise it won’t work.

Go to Settings > Privacy > Location Services > Weather and select Always.

You’ll get even better alerts if you grant Precise Location access.

Next, make sure the Weather app can send notifications.

Go to Settings > Notifications > Weather > Allow Notifications, and then select which type of alerts you want.

Finally, you then need to enable weather alerts.

Go into the Weather app and choose the list icon in the bottom-right.

At the top you’ll see an option called Stay Dry.

If that doesn’t appear, tap the three dots in the top right and then go to Notifications.

Tap Turn On Notifications, and then activate the switch for My Location.

Then tap Done in the top-right and it should work.

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Now you’ll get a warning just before it’s about to start raining where you are.

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