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Ex McDonald’s employee shares her ‘hack’ for saving money on your next small nugget meal | #hacking | #cybersecurity | #infosec | #comptia | #pentest | #hacker


An ex McDonald’s employee has lifted the lid on how Australian customers can save up to 20 per cent on their next small value meal just by ordering in a slightly different way.

Queenie Tan, 26, from Sydney, started researching and investing when she was 19, and she now has a diverse financial portfolio and net worth of more than $500k.

But her first job was as a humble cashier at McDonald’s, where she gained valuable hospitality experience and learnt the value of saving money.

Queenie Tan, 26, from Sydney, started researching and investing when she was 19, and she now has a diverse financial portfolio and net worth of more than $500k

Queenie Tan, 26, from Sydney, started researching and investing when she was 19, and she now has a diverse financial portfolio and net worth of more than $500k

'Did you know you can save 20 per cent off a small meal by making it a Happy Meal instead?' She said in her latest viral video on Instagram

'Did you know you can save 20 per cent off a small meal by making it a Happy Meal instead?' She said in her latest viral video on Instagram

Queenie Tan, 26, from Sydney, started researching and investing when she was 19, and she now has a diverse financial portfolio and net worth of more than $500k

‘Did you know you can save 20 per cent off a small meal by making it a Happy Meal instead?’ She said in her latest viral video on Instagram.

‘I bought a chicken nugget Happy Meal for $8.70 and I bought a small nuggets meal for $10.55.

‘I don’t know what to tell you but they’re the same.’

Both meals come with nuggets, a drink and chips, and the Happy Meal even comes with a limited edition toy.

Her expert knowledge didn’t come as a surprise to everyone though, with some of her followers suggesting they’d already been using the idea themselves.

‘Yes I say it’s for my son but it’s secretly for me instead,’ one woman wrote in the comments section.

‘I used to do this all the time at university, it was so much cheaper!’ Said another.

A third added: ‘Yes I do this a lot. It also works out cheaper at KFC as well’.

In a previous post she shared the six ways to earn more from your career in 2023, whatever your pay grade. 

Queenie said the first thing she has learned about earning more from your job is that it’s always a good idea to start working early or ‘as soon as you can’.

‘I love making money and working, so I got my first job as soon as I was legally able to at 14 and nine months, at McDonald’s,’ Queenie said in her podcast. 

If you want to find out whether you're being paid the going rate for a particular job, the 26-year-old (pictured) recommends consulting Glassdoor, which has anonymous reviews

If you want to find out whether you're being paid the going rate for a particular job, the 26-year-old (pictured) recommends consulting Glassdoor, which has anonymous reviews

If you want to find out whether you’re being paid the going rate for a particular job, the 26-year-old (pictured) recommends consulting Glassdoor, which has anonymous reviews

The 26-year-old explained that starting work so early encouraged her to know and appreciate the value of both work and money, and taught her how to save.

Queenie’s second point is that you should always negotiate hard when you start a new job, as it’s ‘far easier to get the money before you start somewhere’.

‘One of my friends told me that it’s really hard to get a pay rise when you get the job and I have taken this advice everywhere with me,’ Queenie said. 

She also said it’s important to continue getting pay rises as the years pass, as with the cost of living increasing year on year you’re ‘actually getting a bit worse off every year unless you’re getting a pay rise’.

Six ways to boost your pay 

1. Start work as early as possible.

2. Negotiate the pay before you start in a job.

3. Check whether you’re being paid the going rate for a job by checking sites like Glassdoor.

4. Cast around online to see what others in similar jobs are earning.

5. Be professional when you’re negotiating, and if they won’t pay you more, maybe you can WFH or get more holiday days.

6. Start a side hustle. 

In order to find out whether you’re being paid the going rate for a particular job, the 26-year-old recommends consulting some Glassdoor reviews.

‘Glassdoor is a website where employees can leave anonymous reviews and it’s a place where you can be transparent about a company and your role,’ Queenie said.

‘Sometimes people post how much money they’re making and what they earn. So if you never know how to place yourself, it can be interesting to see.’

In a similar vein, Queenie recommends casting around online and checking some websites with pay scales in order to see what ‘other people in similar jobs are earning’.

‘Then, if you’re planning on putting your case to your employer for a pay rise, then gather a bit of evidence on how you’re benefitting the company more than when you started.

‘Then, approach them with how you’re working more efficiently or doing more than what you were hired for,’ she said. 

Queenie recommends casting around online and checking some websites with pay scales in order to see what 'other people in similar jobs are earning' (pictured with her partner Pablo)

Queenie recommends casting around online and checking some websites with pay scales in order to see what 'other people in similar jobs are earning' (pictured with her partner Pablo)

Queenie recommends casting around online and checking some websites with pay scales in order to see what ‘other people in similar jobs are earning’ (pictured with her partner Pablo)

Previously, the 26-year-old has shared her tips to save money 'without sucking the fun from your life'

Previously, the 26-year-old has shared her tips to save money 'without sucking the fun from your life'

Previously, the 26-year-old has shared her tips to save money ‘without sucking the fun from your life’

Importantly, Queenie said you need to ‘be professional’ when you’re negotiating your salary.

If you don’t get the raise you want, it can be good idea to ‘have a backup plan’.

Whether you want more holidays or you fancy working a ‘few remote days a week’, Queenie said these are all things you could put into your meeting with your boss.

‘Finally, to earn more money in 2023, you could start a business or side hustle,’ she said.

‘Pablo [her partner] and I have started businesses in everything from kitchen gadgets to false eyelashes and travel blogs. Even though some of them were failures, we’ve learned a lot.’

Each month, Queenie (pictured) is able to invest up to $5,000 through her six sources of income as well as using equity from her apartment

Each month, Queenie (pictured) is able to invest up to $5,000 through her six sources of income as well as using equity from her apartment

Each month, Queenie (pictured) is able to invest up to $5,000 through her six sources of income as well as using equity from her apartment

Speaking previously to FEMAIL, Queenie revealed how she built her wealth.

Through listening to audiobooks, Queenie quickly learnt investing was the key to generating a passive income to work towards achieving financial flexibility and freedom.

Each month Queenie is able to invest up to $5,000 through her six sources of income as well as using the equity from the apartment.

Queenie admitted she dropped out of her marketing degree and decided to apply for jobs, as she was living from pay cheque to pay cheque and earning only $400 per week.

‘When I was 19 and moved out of home I had no savings and working only covered the bare minimum, so I decided to take a chance to drop out of university – thankfully it paid off,’ she said.

The impressive net worth is calculated by the total number of assets, minus any debt.

She said these assets include her property value, stock and cryptocurrency portfolio, offset account, savings and superannuation. The home loan debt of $455,000 is the only liability.

Queenie’s financial portfolio is diverse but mainly consists of Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) through CMC Markets – a platform that allows users to buy both Australian and international shares for low brokerage fees.

She also uses a platform called Stake to buy US stocks as it’s ‘user friendly’ and also has low brokerage fees.

Alternative Australian ETF platforms that are known to be helpful for beginners include the Raiz, Spaceship and the CommSec pocket app.

‘I invest $5,000 each month to maintain a balance and usually try to track the market before buying,’ she said.

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