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Facebook in October reportedly derailed an investigation into an Islamic State terror suspect by European law enforcement and an Israeli intelligence firm by warning users that their phones had been hacked.

The company’s massively popular messaging platform, WhatsApp, notified some 1,400 users, including the suspect, that an “advanced cyber actor” had gained access to their devices. The suspect, who was believed to be planning a terror attack during the holiday season, disconnected shortly after.

The officials in the unnamed Western European country had hacked the suspect’s phone with software developed by Israel’s NSO group, which they secured with a government contract and the approval of a judge, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

The WhatsApp warning message to users said: “An advanced cyber actor exploited our video calling to install malware on user devices. There’s a possibility this phone number was impacted.”

The company was reportedly unaware of the security investigations.

A Western intelligence official told Channel 12 that the notification had been sent to both Islamic State and Al Qaeda suspects, calling the intelligence breach “a disturbing and dangerous fact,” according to a Sunday report.

The alert foiled investigations into some 20 cases, including into suspected terrorists and pedophiles, the official said.

Investigators breached suspects’ phones “surgically” using a loophole in the app, had been monitoring the suspects for a long time, and following the alert had to start the investigations anew, he said.

The investigation into the Islamic State suspect planning a holiday season attack had relied on the suspect’s phone for information on his activities and communications, and had only had access to the device for a few days — not enough time to complete the probe.

One European intelligence official said that the NSO technology had given his team information on a violent bank-robbing outfit and weapons dealers, which led to arrests. He said that officials in other countries in Western Europe had told him that over 10 investigations may have been thwarted by the WhatsApp message to users.

On October 29, the same day as the alert, WhatsApp sued NSO Group, accusing it of using the platform to conduct cyber-espionage on journalists, human rights activists and others.

The suit, filed in a California federal court, contended that NSO Group tried to infect approximately 1,400 “target devices” with malicious software to steal valuable information from those using the messaging app.

WhatsApp said NSO Group’s hacking was illegal and that it was acting to protect its users.

NSO Group told The Wall Street Journal that its tools were “only licensed, as a lawful solution, to government intelligence and law-enforcement agencies for the sole purpose of preventing and investigating terror and serious crime.”

Most of its clients are Democracies in Europe that use its technology to fight crime and terror, NSO Group said.

NSO Group came to prominence in 2016 when researchers accused it of helping to spy on an activist in the United Arab Emirates.

Its best-known product is Pegasus, a highly invasive tool that can reportedly switch on a target’s phone camera and microphone, and access data on it.

The firm has been adamant that it only licenses its software to governments for “fighting crime and terror,” and that it investigates credible allegations of misuse, but activists say the technology has been instead used for human rights abuses.





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