Info@NationalCyberSecurity
Info@NationalCyberSecurity

How the FBI is fighting an increasing number of ransomware attacks | #hacking | #cybersecurity | #infosec | #comptia | #pentest | #ransomware


Inside a nondescript office building, the FBI is working with IBM to train people to prepare for cyber and ransomware attacks.”The biggest mistake is not having a plan,” said Doug Domin, an agent with the FBI Boston Cyber Task Force. “The most successful victims who are able to be resilient and come back from an attack are those that have a plan.”We met up with Domin at the IBM Security X-Force Cyber Range in Cambridge, where the FBI has joined forces with the company to help defend against cyber criminals. A key point they emphasize is that companies should get law enforcement involved before an attack so they can immediately help respond.”Everyone is a target,” said John Dwyer, head of research for IBM Security X Force.Dwyer said involving law enforcement also saves companies money. IBM’s recent Cost of Data Breach report found ransomware victims that involved law enforcement saved $470,000 in costs of the breach compared to those that didn’t.”Organizations can take that to say that it actually pays to involve law enforcement whenever you’re experiencing a ransomware attack,” Dwyer said.The threat to health care and hospitals is especially critical. Among critical infrastructure targets, hospitals and other health care facilities are the most targeted, according to the FBI.”These are not just data theft crimes. These are not just financial crimes. These are potentially threat to life crimes,” John Riggi, a former leader in the FBI’s cyber division and now the National Advisor for Cybersecurity and Risk at the American Hospital Association, said in an interview.And the attacks have skyrocketed. Riggi said last year, 118 million people’s personal information was stolen from ransomware and cyber attacks on hospitals and health care organizations, nearly five times as many as in 2020.Last Christmas, Anna Jacques Hospital in Newburyport encountered a cyber attack, for example, that forced it to divert ambulances temporarily.A hospital spokesperson told 5 Investigates they did contact the FBI, and the hospital remains fully operational. It can take weeks or even months to recover from a ransomware attack, and Anna Jacques said they are continuing to meet milestones in their IT recovery. “When you potentially disrupt urgent care or radiation oncology treatment, any type of cancer treatment or ambulances go on diversion where stroke, heart attack or trauma patients are being diverted to further away. That immediately that delay, that delay in urgent care immediately creates an increased risk of patient harm,” Riggi said.

Inside a nondescript office building, the FBI is working with IBM to train people to prepare for cyber and ransomware attacks.

“The biggest mistake is not having a plan,” said Doug Domin, an agent with the FBI Boston Cyber Task Force. “The most successful victims who are able to be resilient and come back from an attack are those that have a plan.”

We met up with Domin at the IBM Security X-Force Cyber Range in Cambridge, where the FBI has joined forces with the company to help defend against cyber criminals. A key point they emphasize is that companies should get law enforcement involved before an attack so they can immediately help respond.

“Everyone is a target,” said John Dwyer, head of research for IBM Security X Force.

Dwyer said involving law enforcement also saves companies money. IBM’s recent Cost of Data Breach report found ransomware victims that involved law enforcement saved $470,000 in costs of the breach compared to those that didn’t.

“Organizations can take that to say that it actually pays to involve law enforcement whenever you’re experiencing a ransomware attack,” Dwyer said.

The threat to health care and hospitals is especially critical. Among critical infrastructure targets, hospitals and other health care facilities are the most targeted, according to the FBI.

“These are not just data theft crimes. These are not just financial crimes. These are potentially threat to life crimes,” John Riggi, a former leader in the FBI’s cyber division and now the National Advisor for Cybersecurity and Risk at the American Hospital Association, said in an interview.

And the attacks have skyrocketed. Riggi said last year, 118 million people’s personal information was stolen from ransomware and cyber attacks on hospitals and health care organizations, nearly five times as many as in 2020.

Last Christmas, Anna Jacques Hospital in Newburyport encountered a cyber attack, for example, that forced it to divert ambulances temporarily.

A hospital spokesperson told 5 Investigates they did contact the FBI, and the hospital remains fully operational. It can take weeks or even months to recover from a ransomware attack, and Anna Jacques said they are continuing to meet milestones in their IT recovery.

“When you potentially disrupt urgent care or radiation oncology treatment, any type of cancer treatment or ambulances go on diversion where stroke, heart attack or trauma patients are being diverted to further away. That immediately that delay, that delay in urgent care immediately creates an increased risk of patient harm,” Riggi said.

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