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Judge dismisses University of Wyoming sorority sisters’ lawsuit attempting to block transgender woman Artemis Langford from joining and says ‘the court will not define a ”woman” today’ | #childpredator | #kidsaftey | #childsaftey



By Stephen M. Lepore For Dailymail.Com and Associated Press

Updated: 07:30 29 Aug 2023



A judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by University of Wyoming sorority sisters contesting the admission of a transgender woman whom they accused of being a sexual predator.

In the lawsuit, members of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority chapter challenged Artemis Langford’s admission by casting doubt on whether sorority rules allowed a transgender woman. 

A district court judge dismissed the suit, having found that sorority bylaws – as a private, voluntary organization – don’t define who’s a woman. 

The members raised safety concerns and detailed allegations against Langford, but said they were told to ‘change our definition of woman’ in the September 2022 lawsuit

Several members of the sorority also claimed Langford’s presence in their home left them feeling ‘vulnerable’ and ‘uncomfortable’. 

A judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by University of Wyoming sorority sisters contesting the admission of a transgender woman – Artemis Langford (pictured) – whom they accused of being a sexual predator
In the lawsuit, members of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority chapter challenged Artemis Langford’s (rear, far left) admission by casting doubt on whether sorority rules allowed a transgender woman

They alleged that she would stare at the other girls for hours without saying anything, while sitting with a pillow in her lap. 

They also accused her of taking photos of the girls at a slumber party and making inappropriate comments to them, including about ‘what vaginas look like, breast cup size, whether women were considering breast reductions and birth control’. 

On one occasion, one of the women claimed she was changing clothes inside the house without a bra on, but turned around to find Langford, 21, staring at her, the complaint alleged.

Fellow sisters reportedly later said that Langford had ‘his hands over his genitals’ and appeared sexually aroused.

At the heart of the lawsuit was the issue of defining a ‘woman’, with the sorority sisters arguing that because KKG’s governing documents define it as a space exclusively for females, the organization broke its own rules by admitting a biological male. The sisters claimed that the sorority changed its criteria to allow Langford to apply, while KKGs lawyers said the definition of ‘woman’ has evolved since the sorority’s founding 150 years ago.

‘The term (woman) is unquestionably open to many interpretations,’ the sorority’s filing claimed.

Although the plaintiffs offered a definition in their lawsuit as an ‘adult human female’, KKG said this was restrictive, and were seeking to dismiss on the basis of changing views around what constitutes a ‘woman’.

At the heart of the lawsuit was the issue of defining a ‘woman’, as the sorority sisters argued that because KKG’s governing documents define it as a space exclusively for females, the organization broke its own rules by admitting a biological male
One member said that she was called a ‘bigot and a transphobe’ for not wanting to shower and sleep with Langford in the same area

The case at Wyoming’s only four-year public university drew widespread attention as transgender people fight for more acceptance in schools, athletics, workplaces and elsewhere, while some, like these sorority sisters, push back. 

They described the sorority as a ‘safe space to grow together and build genuine, long-lasting relationships’ as well as a ‘refuge for us – biological women – to relax and release from the pressure and stress that come with college and life.’ 

Wyoming U.S. District Court Judge Alan Johnson, in his ruling, found that sorority bylaws – as a private, voluntary organization – don’t define who’s a woman.

A federal court cannot interfere with the sorority chapter’s freedom of association by ruling against its vote to induct the transgender woman last year, Johnson ruled Friday.

With no definition of a woman in sorority bylaws, Johnson ruled that he could not impose the six sisters’ definition of a woman in place of the sorority’s more expansive definition provided in court.

‘With its inquiry beginning and ending there, the court will not define a ‘woman’ today,’ Johnson, himself an alumnus of the university who was honored by the school as Distinguished Alumni in 2015, wrote.

The sorority sisters who sued publicly shared how Langford’s presence in their house made them squirm. 

‘It is really uncomfortable. Some of the girls have been sexually assaulted or sexually harassed. Some girls live in constant fear in our home,’ Holtmeier told Megyn Kelly on her podcast. 

Wyoming U.S. District Court Judge Alan Johnson, in his ruling, found that sorority bylaws – as a private, voluntary organization – don’t define who’s a woman
Some of the sorority sisters told The Megyn Kelly Show that they felt pressured to accept Langford into their house despite their fears

‘Men are never allowed on the second floor of our house apart from moving in and moving out. 

‘So it is an only-female space and not like living in the dorms. We share just a couple of main bathrooms but it is supposed to be safe space for us to rest our head at night.’

This culminated in the lawsuit, which was brought against the sorority’s parent organization, its president Mary Pat Rooney, and its housing corporation. Langford was named in the lawsuit, but was not being sought for monetary damages. 

Some of the sisters also alleged that the sorority’s leadership pressured and bullied the members to accept Langford into the group. 

One sister, who remained anonymous, told the National Review that Langford has not made ‘any effort’ to ‘physically look like a girl’, adding: ‘He’s just calling himself a girl. All you have to do is identify as a she/her.’

In a response to the complaint were photos of a number of text exchanges between sorority members that implied there was doubt among sisters as to whether or not the allegations against Langford were made up. 

‘This sworn allegation appears to be a game of telephone after one sorority sister told a drunken story to another, who repeated the story,’ read the filing on behalf of Langford, written by her attorney, Rachel Berkness.

In one message, a member who claimed to be present in the room at the time of the alleged incident appeared to write to another member: ‘i’m pretty much 100% positive it did not happen. but like also what if [redacted] actually saw something like that… i don’t want to be saying this awful thing didn’t happen’.

A photo of a text exchange between two KKG sorority members appearing to contradict earlier accusations that Langford has a visible erection around sisters
In one message a member who claimed to be in the room at the time of the alleged incident appeared to write to another member: ‘i’m pretty much 100% positive it did not happen’

Another exchange read: ‘but i don’t think she was being serious cuz i watched him the whole time. he was standing there in the doorway for like 2 seconds and he didn’t get a b***r.’ 

The other person responded: ‘But still Artemis is creepy in other ways at least’. 

Another message came from a sister who said she was told by one of those who claimed to have been a witness that it was a lie.

‘As we were walking downtown she told me that [sister] lied about Artemis getting a b***r while watching her change,’ read part of the message.

In her filing Berkness referred to this exhibit.

Berkness also made a separate argument that an agenda to remove Langford from the sorority had been alive from the very moment she joined.

An attorney for the sorority sisters, Cassie Craven, said by email they disagreed with the ruling and the fundamental issue – the definition of a woman – remains undecided

To support that argument she includes in her submission to the court an email that appears to have been authored by the mother of one of the sorority members, in which she ‘predicts that there would be ‘issues’ and ‘ramifications’ of a ‘TRANSGENDER’ woman’s acceptance’.

‘The allegations against Ms. Langford should never have made it into a legal filing. They are nothing more than cruel rumors that mirror exactly the type of rumors used to vilify and dehumanize members of the LGBTQIA+ community for generations. And they are baseless,’ Berkness said in an email following the ruling. 

An attorney for the sorority sisters, Cassie Craven, said by email they disagreed with the ruling and the fundamental issue – the definition of a woman – remains undecided.

‘Women have a biological reality that deserves to be protected and recognized and we will continue to fight for that right just as women suffragists for decades have been told that their bodies, opinions, and safety doesn’t matter,’ Craven wrote.





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