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McConnell announces millions in funding for colleges teaching cyber security in Kentucky | #hacking | #cybersecurity | #infosec | #comptia | #pentest | #ransomware


Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing his support for enhanced cybersecurity to the state. This morning, he announced $20 million in federal funding for workforce training in Kentucky.The University of Louisville could get a piece of the pie, but they’ll have to work for it.The $20 million in federal taxpayer dollars is for all of Kentucky. Colleges and universities will compete to determine their cut.UofL started a cybersecurity training program in 2020 with money from the NSA. Students learn to fight hackers with classes available online and in campus labs.McConnell says he advocated for more money, which will benefit the economy and national security.“Kentucky’s university system is at the center of our country’s cybersecurity field, and I’ve tried to help them get there,” McConnell said.From big corporations to smartphone users, we’re all connected to the internet. Our digital assets are valuable, and online security experts say protection is more important each passing day.Dr. Sharon Kerrick, assistant VP of the University of Louisville’s Digital Transformation Center, says anyone can be hacked. A simple lapse in personal device security could allow a hacker to gain access.”I will see someone’s laptop up, and I will type a message to them and to myself saying I could have taken anything I wanted from your laptop. I’m just giving you a warning,” Kerrick said.Right now, there are 4,000 open cybersecurity jobs in Kentucky. It’s a growing field, and Louisville is teaching and training students to fill those jobs.Protection is needed because almost anything can be hacked, even an internet-connected refrigerator.Medical equipment is also a potential target.“If you are sick or in the hospital and connected to life-saving equipment, that is also connected to the internet, and that brings up the risk in all segments of our economy to cyberattacks”, says Dr. Kevin Gardner, UL’s EVP for Research and Innovation.Again, the federal funding isn’t a done deal just yet. The university hopes to get millions but will be competing against other schools.If UofL wins some or all of the $20 million for cybersecurity workforce training, they expect to receive the money later this year.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing his support for enhanced cybersecurity to the state.

This morning, he announced $20 million in federal funding for workforce training in Kentucky.

The University of Louisville could get a piece of the pie, but they’ll have to work for it.

The $20 million in federal taxpayer dollars is for all of Kentucky. Colleges and universities will compete to determine their cut.

UofL started a cybersecurity training program in 2020 with money from the NSA. Students learn to fight hackers with classes available online and in campus labs.

McConnell says he advocated for more money, which will benefit the economy and national security.

“Kentucky’s university system is at the center of our country’s cybersecurity field, and I’ve tried to help them get there,” McConnell said.

From big corporations to smartphone users, we’re all connected to the internet. Our digital assets are valuable, and online security experts say protection is more important each passing day.

Dr. Sharon Kerrick, assistant VP of the University of Louisville’s Digital Transformation Center, says anyone can be hacked. A simple lapse in personal device security could allow a hacker to gain access.

“I will see someone’s laptop up, and I will type a message to them and to myself saying I could have taken anything I wanted from your laptop. I’m just giving you a warning,” Kerrick said.

Right now, there are 4,000 open cybersecurity jobs in Kentucky. It’s a growing field, and Louisville is teaching and training students to fill those jobs.

Protection is needed because almost anything can be hacked, even an internet-connected refrigerator.

Medical equipment is also a potential target.

“If you are sick or in the hospital and connected to life-saving equipment, that is also connected to the internet, and that brings up the risk in all segments of our economy to cyberattacks”, says Dr. Kevin Gardner, UL’s EVP for Research and Innovation.

Again, the federal funding isn’t a done deal just yet. The university hopes to get millions but will be competing against other schools.

If UofL wins some or all of the $20 million for cybersecurity workforce training, they expect to receive the money later this year.

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