Info@NationalCyberSecurity
Info@NationalCyberSecurity

[Mission 2024] Insights SECURE SYNOPSIS: 18 October 2023 | #daitngscams | #lovescams | #datingscams | #love | #relationships | #scams | #pof | #match.com | #dating


 

NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same


General Studies – 1


 

Topic: Modern Indian history from about the middle of the eighteenth century until the present- significant events, personalities, issues.

1. Discuss role of Sir Syed Ahmad Khan as a reformer in promoting women’s rights and education during a challenging period in India’s history. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Easy

Reference: Indian Express , Insights on India

Why the question:

The article discusses Sir Syed Ahmed Khan’s 125th birth anniversary and his contributions to women’s rights.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the reformist contributions of Sir Syed Ahmad Khan to modern India.

Directive word: 

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you must debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You must give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Write about how the Sir Syed Ahmad Khan was torch bearer of reforms of late 19th century among the Muslim community.

Body:

In the first part, write in detail about the contributions to Modern Education and step taken by Sir Syed Ahmad Khan in this regard. Write about his role in promoting women’s rights.

Next, enumerate the steps taken by Sir Syed Ahmad Khan to work towards Hindu-Muslim Unity.

Conclusion:

Conclude by mentioning the impact of the above measures taken by Sir Syed Ahmad Khan.

Introduction

Sir Syed Ahmed khan was a teacher, politician, social reformer etc and founder of Aligarh Muslim university. He has often been criticised as the father of Two nation theory which led to the formation of two separate nations i.e. India and Pakistan. It is erroneously believed by some historians that the Hindu-Muslim divide in India was the by-product of the two-nation theory which supposedly had its origin in Sir Syed’s ideology.

Body

Social Reformer: 

  • He also pushed for social reforms and was a champion of democratic ideals and freedom of speech.
  • He was against religious intolerance, ignorance and irrationalism. He denounced purdah, polygamy and easy divorce.
  • Tahzebul Akhlaq(Social Reformer in English),a magazine founded by him, tried to awaken people’s consciousness on social and religious issues in a very expressive prose.

Educationist: 

  • Sir Syed is, first and foremost, known for his pioneering role in transforming the educational opportunities for Muslims.
  • Sir Syed realised that Muslims could only make progress if they took to modern education. For this he started the Aligarh movement.
  • In 1877, he founded the Muhammadan Anglo Oriental College on the pattern of Oxford and Cambridge universities. The college later grew into Aligarh Muslim University.

Moderniser:

  • His systemic movement aimed at reforming the social, political and educational aspects of the Muslim community.
  • The Aligarh Movement helped in the Muslim revival. It gave them a common language— Urdu.
  • The movement undertook to modernise Muslim’s education by adapting English as a medium of learning and western education rather than just focusing on traditional teachings.
  • Sir Syed established the Scientific Society in 1864,in Aligarh to translate Western works into Indian languages to prepare the Muslims to accept Western education and to inculcate scientific temperament among the Muslims.

Conclusion:

Throughout his life, Syed Ahmad Khan remonstrated against the practices of purdah, polygamy, easy divorce and many other fallacies in his community. His main priority was advancement of modern western education, in Muslim society. He believed that his community can only enhance their status and progress when the Muslims accept western scientific knowledge and culture. In AD 1864, he established the Translation Society at Aligarh. It was later renamed the Scientific Society.

Value addition

Critical of National Movement:

  • In his later years Sir Syed encouraged the Indian Muslims not to join the National Movement. He felt that education and not politics was needed by them.
  • In a way he encouraged the forces of communalism and separatism at this stage.

Belief in multiculturalism:

  • Sir Syed believed in a multiculturalism under which all cultural communities must be entitled to equal status under state.
  • The view that people must be incorporated not merely as citizens but also members of distinct communities possessing multiple identities is one of the most cherished norms of liberal democratic traditions. This means rejection of “melting pot” and acceptance of “salad bowl” theory where integration rather than assimilation is the preferred choice.
  • Thus, under Article 29of the Indian Constitution, distinct cultural communities are entitled to preservation of their distinct language, script and culture.

 

 


General Studies – 2


 

Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

2. The Supreme Court of India’s refusal to accord legal recognition to marriages between persons of the same sex is a huge legal setback to the queer community in the country. Do you think was a missed opportunity to grant equality to queer couples? (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu , Insights on India

Why the question:

The article discusses the Supreme Court’s verdict on same-sex marriage and the intersection of law and custom in India.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about legalising same-sex marriages in the country and impact of recent SC judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving context with respect to same-sex marriages.

Body:

In the first part, write about the need to legalise same-sex marriages in the country post the Navtej Johar judgement – Equal rights, improving mental health, ending stigma, granting protection, for true inclusivity etc.

In the next part, write about the impediments and legal obstacles to legalising same-sex marriages and its impact on social ethos. Throw light on the recent SC judgement and its implications on the queer community.

Next, write about measures that can be taken in this regard.

Conclusion:

Conclude with a balanced opinion on the issue.

Introduction

In a historic move, the Navtej Johar judgement of 2018 decriminalized homosexuality in India, overturning a colonial-era law that had criminalized same-sex relationships. This landmark decision marked a significant step towards recognizing the rights and dignity of the LGBTQ+ community. However, there is still much progress to be made. One crucial aspect that requires immediate attention is the legalization of same-sex marriages. This essay will elucidate the pressing need for India to extend legal recognition to same-sex marriages, touching upon key facets such as equal rights, improved mental health, ending stigma, granting protection, and fostering true inclusivity.

Body

Judgement by Supreme Court

  • All five judges have chosen to leave it to the legislature to enact such a law.
  • Chief Justice of India D.Y. Chandrachud and Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul have ruled that queer couples have a right to seek recognition for their union, but declined to read down the provisions of the Special Mariages Act to that effect.
  • On the other hand, Justices S. Ravindra Bhat, Hima Kohli and P.S. Narasimha reject the position, holding that any such recognition can only be based on statute.
  • In effect, the Court has accepted the government’s view that any move to legalise same-sex marriages will fall in the legislature’s domain.

Need to legalise same-sex marriages in the country

  • Equal Rights and Dignity: Legalizing same-sex marriages is fundamentally about upholding the principles of equality and dignity for all citizens, regardless of sexual orientation.
    • Denying same-sex couples the right to marry is a direct contradiction to the constitutional values of justice, liberty, and fraternit By legalizing these unions, India would take a significant stride towards recognizing LGBTQ+ individuals as equal members of society, thereby affirming their right to love and commitment, just like their heterosexual counterparts.
  • Improving Mental Health and Well-being: The mental health of LGBTQ+ individuals, particularly those in same-sex relationships, is often adversely affected by societal discrimination and legal marginalization.
    • Research consistently shows that granting legal recognition to same-sex marriages leads to improved mental health outcomes.
    • When individuals feel supported and recognized by society, they are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety, and other mental health issues.
    • Legalizing same-sex marriages is a vital step towards nurturing a more inclusive and mentally healthy society.
  • Ending Stigma and Discrimination: Discrimination against LGBTQ+ individuals, especially those in same-sex relationships, persists in various forms, from social ostracization to workplace discrimination.
    • Legal recognition of same-sex marriages sends a powerful message that love knows no gender and that all citizens, regardless of sexual orientation, are entitled to the same rights and privileges.
    • It serves as a catalyst for dismantling deeply ingrained prejudices and stereotypes, fostering a society where diversity is celebrated rather than feared.
  • Granting Legal Protections: Legal recognition of same-sex marriages provides crucial protections for couples and their families.
    • It ensures access to inheritance rights, property rights, and spousal benefits, which are essential for the financial security and stability of LGBTQ+ families.
    • Additionally, it guarantees legal recourse in cases of divorce or separation, affording same-sex couples the same legal protections that heterosexual couples enjoy.
  • True Inclusivity and Social Progress: A society that embraces diversity and inclusivity thrives and progresses. Legalizing same-sex marriages is a testament to India’s commitment to being an inclusive nation that values the rights and dignity of all its citizens. It signifies a shift towards a more progressive and forward-thinking society, one that recognizes the inherent worth of every individual, regardless of sexual orientation.

 Recent judgement and implications for queer community

  • In concluding that there is no fundamental right to marry, the Court has negated the expectation that it would not allow discrimination against same-sex couples in the marital domain to continue.
  • Marriage is indeed a social institution, with its own legal requirements and conditions for what constitutes a valid marriage.
  • The right to seek social and legal validation through marriage is a matter of individual choice protected by the Constitution, but the Court still views it as being subject to statutory limitations.
  • The majority disfavours the position that queer couples have a right to adopt children, but agrees with the minority that there is no bar on transpersons entering into heterosexual marriages.
  • There is no disagreement among the judges about the right of such same-sex couples to cohabit and be free from coercion and threats.
  • Given that large sections of India may be opposed to the legalisation of same-sex marriages on religious and cultural grounds, the possibility of Parliament taking the initiative to do so is quite bleak.
  • The LGBTQIA+ community may now have to take heart from the Court’s direction that the government should form a committee to decide the rights and entitlements of queer couples.

Conclusion

In the wake of the Navtej Johar judgement, India has taken a monumental step towards recognizing the rights of LGBTQ+ individuals. However, true equality can only be achieved through the legalization of same-sex marriages. By doing so, India not only affirms the equal rights and dignity of all citizens but also improves mental health outcomes, ends stigma, grants essential legal protections, and fosters a society marked by true inclusivity. Legalizing same-sex marriages is not just a legal matter; it is a testament to India’s commitment to being a nation that embraces and celebrates diversity in all its forms. It is now upto the Parliament to decide.

 

Topic: Role of civil services in a democracy.

3. Civil servants who uphold ethics and reject scams play a significant role in preserving the integrity and credibility of the civil service. Discuss. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Easy

Reference: Indian Express , Insights on India

Why the question:

The article discusses the importance of civil servants who refuse to engage in corrupt practices, portraying them as national icons.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the roles played by ethical civil servants in the modern government and its role impact.

Directive:

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you must debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You must give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Start by mentioning the role of civil services in the modern day.

Body:

First, in detail, write about the roles performed by the ethical civil servants – dedication to serving the nation and their actions inspire others to follow suit, ultimately contributing to better governance and public service.

Next, underscores the need to recognize and celebrate such individuals as symbols of honesty and integrity within the civil service. Substantiate with examples.

 Conclusion:

Conclude by summarising.

Introduction

Civil servants are the cornerstone of a transparent, accountable, and effective civil service. By upholding ethical standards and rejecting involvement in scams, civil servants play a pivotal role in preserving the integrity and credibility of government institutions, ultimately benefiting society as a whole.

Body

  • Public Trust: Ethical civil servants are the bedrock of public trust in government institutions. When citizens perceive civil servants as honest, transparent, and committed to the public good, they are more likely to have faith in the government’s ability to serve their interests.
    • T N Seshan, the IAS officer who served as chief election commissioner from 1990 to 1996, resisted political interference by all parties and was responsible for institutionalising free and fair elections in India. He was almost impeached, but he stayed the course. Today he is an icon of honest IAS officers.
  • Combatting Corruption: Ethical civil servants are a critical force against corruption. They resist engaging in fraudulent activities or scams, thereby safeguarding public resources and ensuring that they are used for their intended purposes.
    • Ashok Khemka, a 1991 batch IAS officer of the Haryana cadre, shot to fame for cancelling the mutation of Gandhi in-law Robert Vadra’s land in Gurugram. Khemka’s subsequent campaign against corruption saw him being transferred 55 times by both Congress and BJP governments.
  • Rule of Law: Upholding ethical standards is closely tied to upholding the rule of law. Ethical civil servants are more likely to adhere to established rules, regulations, and procedures, which is essential for a well-functioning civil service.
  • Efficient Service Delivery: Ethical civil servants are less likely to engage in wasteful or inefficient practices. This leads to more effective and efficient service delivery, as resources are used judiciously.
  • Leadership by Example: Ethical civil servants serve as role models for their colleagues and subordinates. Their adherence to high ethical standards sets a positive example, encouraging others to follow suit and fostering a culture of integrity within the civil service.
  • Political Neutrality: Ethical civil servants are less susceptible to political pressures or interference. They make decisions based on merit, objective criteria, and the best interests of the public, rather than succumbing to partisan influences.
  • Protection of Vulnerable Populations: Ethical civil servants are crucial in safeguarding the rights and interests of vulnerable and marginalized populations. They ensure that policies and programs are implemented fairly and without discrimination.
  • Global Reputation: A civil service known for its ethical conduct enhances a country’s reputation on the international stage. It signals to the global community that the government is committed to transparency, accountability, and good governance.
  • Long-Term Institutional Health: Ethical conduct contributes to the long-term health and sustainability of government institutions. It reduces the risk of institutional decay and ensures that the civil service remains effective and trusted by future generations.

 

Conclusion

Officers recruited from UPSC are the top brains in our civil services, having secured their appointments through rigorous competition. These bureaucrats are expected to interpret and implement public policy without fear or favour. Not owing their appointment to political masters, nor being subject to populism, they are supposed to steer a course for the common weal.

 

 


General Studies – 3


 

Topic: Effects of liberalization on the economy.

4.  The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the New Development Bank (NDB) are two prominent multilateral financial institutions that have emerged as alternatives to the Bretton Woods institutions. Examine.

Difficulty level: Tough

Reference: Insights on India

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 3 and mentioned as part of Mission-2024 Secure timetable.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the drawbacks of WB and IMF and suggest possible reforms in it and to write about the potential of AIIB and NDB as alternatives to IMF and WB.

Directive word: 

Examine – When asked to ‘Examine’, we must investigate the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving context.

Body:

First, in brief, write about the major aspects of global economy that WB and IMF deal with.

Next, using facts and figures to substantiate, give the successes and limitations of WB and IMF in regards to – voting rights, dominance by global north, foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world etc.

Next, suggest possible reforms that are needed in the IMF.

Next, write about the potential and limitations of AIIB and NDB to be alternatives for IMF and WB.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

The China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the BRICS New Development Bank (NDB), the latter jointly run by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, were partly born out of frustration with the decision-making structure at big lenders such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, where some developing countries don’t enjoy voting rights that reflect their contribution to the global economy.

Body:

Mandate of New Development Bank (NDB):

The NDB has been envisaged as a “dedicated channel of alternate finance” with greater focus on emerging economies and the Global South.

  • Promotion of infrastructure and sustainable development projects with a significant development impact in member countries;
  • Establish strategic partnerships with other multilateral development institutions and national development banks;
  • Build a balanced project portfolio giving due respect to their geographic location, financing requirements and other factors;
  • Promoting competitiveness and facilitating job creation;
  • Build a robust knowledge sharing platform among developing countries.

Mandate of Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB):

The core mandate of the AIIB is to address Asia-Pacific’s acute infrastructural needs. Its mission is “to improve economic and social development in Asia by investing in high-quality, financially viable and eco-friendly infrastructure projects”. It also aims to mobilize private capital to co-finance projects. The creation of the AIIB is a welcome initiative given Asia’s huge infrastructural deficit.

NDB, AIIB vis-à-vis the western multilateral banks:

  • Cause of formation of bank: The establishment of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) in 1944. Its initial purpose was to provide finance for the reconstruction of Europe after the Second World War, and to promote development in developing countries. The creation of NDB and AIIB was because of the discriminatory attitude of the West towards the developing countries. this reflects the growing power of the world’s emerging economies, particularly China, and their discontent with the governance of the traditional MDBs, which they view as imbalanced
  • Headquarters: The headquarters of NDB and AIIB are located in China whereas the headquarters of existing multilateral banks are located in USA or Europe.
  • Geographical coverage: Global multilateral finance institutions are considered to have a wide geographical scope across several regions. Regional development banks are defined as extending their operations across one entire region such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) and the New Development Bank (NDB).
  • Distinction between regional and non- regional member: The distinction between regional and non-regional members does not apply if, for example, the structure of the bank is not based on a geographical region (e.g. the global banks like the World Bank)
  • Shareholders: The size of membership varies considerably: from 189 members of the World Bank (IBRD) covering nearly every country in the world, to five for the recently established NDB
  • Voting rights: Both the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are based on weighted voting system, which provide the rich countries a big say in the management. The BRICS member countries accounting for almost half of the world’s population and about one-fifth of global economic output have only 11 per cent of the votes at international financial institutions like the IMF. However, in NDB all member nations have equal voting rights.
  • Veto power:
    • Shareholders have veto power if they have a large enough share of votes to block decisions that require majorities. The exact share required for veto power varies. The US, for example, holds veto power in the IBRD with only 16% of the votes because some decisions require a majority of 85%.
    • All five shareholders in the NDB hold 20% of the shares without having veto power – the result of an explicit decision on the part of the founding members.
    • In the newly established AIIB, China has hinted that it would be willing to give up veto power as the bank attracts more shareholders. However, China retains its veto power with a 27% share, as special majority decisions require 75% of the voting power.
    • Board composition: Most banks have non-resident boards of directors. Only the World Bank and two Latin American sub-regional banks have resident boards. The two newly-established AIIB and NDB, are reported to have non-resident boards as a matter of policy to reduce bureaucracy, in keeping with their ‘lean’ banking model.
  • Graduation policies:
    • The graduation policy from IBRD assistance is based on a determination of whether the country has reached a level of institutional development and capital-market access that enables it to sustain its own development process without recourse to Bank funding.
    • For AIIB: In its Articles of Agreement, eligibility to borrowing is open to any agency, instrumentality or political subdivision thereof, or any entity or enterprise operating in the territory of a member, as well as to international or regional agencies or entities concerned with economic development of the region. In special circumstances, the AIIB can provide assistance to a recipient not listed, but this will require the Board of Governors’ approval and must support the AIIB’s mandate.
    • For NDB: Eligibility based on membership to the UN. No graduation policy
  • Measurement of development effectiveness:
    • AIIB: As yet, there are only results indicators for individual approved projects. No overall development effectiveness framework exists.
    • World Bank: The Independent Evaluation Group employs a number of evaluation instruments: ad hoc major evaluations, country programme evaluations, cluster country programme evaluations, validation of self-evaluations, project performance assessment reports, as well as reviews and impact evaluations. The indicators used vary across different projects.
  • Policy priorities:
    • AIIB: Infrastructure: clean energy, transport infrastructure, irrigation, water resource management and sanitation, sustainable urban development, economic cooperation and integration.
    • World bank: Extreme poverty and shared prosperity
  • Conditionality for loans: AIIB and NDB seek to avoid the strict conditionality of market and structural reform with which loans from the World Bank and IMF have been administered.

 Conclusion:

The creation of the two banks NDB and AIIB is indeed a remarkable development. They reflect changing geo-economic dimension at the global level with the shift of economic power from West to the East. These two institutions have for the first time opened up “a strategic rivalry with Western and Japanese led lending institutions, namely the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the Asian Development Bank (ADB), mirroring the broader tussle for power and influence between the developed and developing world”. Indeed, the two banks represent a quest for equality for the developing countries as far as the global financial architecture is concerned.

 

Topic: Indian Economy and issues relating to planning, mobilization, of resources, growth, development and employment.

5. World Bank has played a vital role in facilitating India’s developmental objectives by providing financial resources, technical expertise, and policy guidance. Its impact on India’s development has been significant, and its continued partnership remains crucial in addressing the country’s evolving challenges and opportunities. Evaluate. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: Insights on India

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 3 and mentioned as part of Mission-2024 Secure timetable.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the role of world bank as the facilitator of development in India.

Directive word: 

Evaluate – When you are asked to evaluate, you have to pass a sound judgement about the truth of the given statement in the question or the topic based on evidence.  You must appraise the worth of the statement in question. There is scope for forming an opinion here.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Start by explaining India’s relationship with World Bank since Independence.

Body:

In the first part, explain the ways the world bank has helped India since its independence – India is the largest recipient of loans from the World amounting to $102.1 billion, 77 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, a part of the World Bank group, has lent India $57.2 billion, and the International Development Association, a multilateral concessional lender World Bank, has loaned $49.4 billion to India over the last 70 years.

Also write about, World Bank’s close partnership with the and State Governments and other development partners – non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the private and the public including academics, scientists, economists, journalists, and local people etc. Mention the schemes launched with respect to the above.

Next, write about various limitations associated with world bank funds.

Conclusion:

Conclude with balanced opinion regarding the role of World Bank in India’s economic development.

Introduction

The World Bank is an international organization dedicated to providing financing, advice, and research to developing nations to aid their economic advancement. The bank predominantly acts as an organization that attempts to fight poverty by offering developmental assistance to middle- and low-income countries. The World Bank was created in 1944 out of the Bretton Woods Agreement, which was secured under the auspices of the United Nations in the latter days of World War II. The World Bank are headquartered in Washington, D.C

Body

World Bank’s support to India since Independence

  • The cooperation between the World Bank and India goes back to the foundation of the International Bank of Reconstruction and Developmentin 1944
  • India received its first bank loanof US$34million from the International Bank of Reconstruction and Development in November 1948 for railway rehabilitation
  • During the 1950s, the IBRD was India’s sole sourceof World Bank borrowings
  • During the 1960s and 1970s, the IDA accounted for nearly three-fourths of all WB lending to India and, in turn, India was by far the largest recipient of IDA funds, accounting for more than two-fifths of all its lending
  • The lending portfolio changed sharplyafter the 1991 macroeconomic crisis
    • India became one of the last important borrowers in order to undertake structural adjustment lending
  • Currently, the World Bank Group (WBG) has approved a $25-30 billion commitment plan for India for the period 2019-22

World Bank’s role as a facilitator of developmental objectives

  • Education
    • Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan programme aimed to provide elementary education for around 200 million children across the country.
    • Odisha Higher Education Program for Excellence and Equity: The development objective of the Program is to improve the quality of and students’ equitable access to selected institutions and enhance governance of the higher education system in Odisha
  • Agriculture
    • National Dairy Support Project: The development objective is to increase the productivity of milch animals and improve market access of milk producers in project areas
    • Atal Bhujal Yojana (Abhy)-National Groundwater Management Improvement: This is an initiative for ensuring long term sustainability of ground water resources in the country.
  • Health
    • Program Towards Elimination of Tuberculosis: The objective of the programme is to improve the coverage and quality of TB control interventions in the private and public sector in targeted states of India.
    • Innovate in India for Inclusiveness: The development objective of Innovate in India for Inclusiveness is to facilitate innovation in biopharmaceutical products and medical devices that address public health priorities in India.
  • Food Security
    • National Nutrition Mission: The development objective is to support the Government of India and participating states to
      • strengthen the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) policy framework, systems and capacities, and facilitate community engagement
      • to ensure greater focus on children under three years of age;
      • strengthen convergent actions for improved nutrition outcomes
    • Infrastructure
      • Dam Rehabilitation & Improvement Project: This is to improve the safety and operational performance of selected existing dams in the territory of the participating states
      • Eastern Dedicated Freight Corridor Project: The Government of India and the World Bank signed a $650 million agreement for faster and more efficient movement of raw materials and finished goods between the north and eastern parts of India
      • Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojana Project
    • Human Resource Development
      • Skill India Mission: The project has been developed to enhance institutional mechanisms for skill development and increase access to quality and market-relevant training for the workforce.
      • Nai Manzil – Education and Skills Training for Minorities: The project aims to improve completion of secondary education and market-driven skills training for targeted youth from minority communities.
      • North East Rural Livelihoods Project (NERLP): The development objective of the North East Rural Livelihoods Project for India is to improve rural livelihoods, especially that of women, unemployed youths and the most disadvantaged, in the participating North Eastern States.

Conclusion

Thus, for India financial help from every source is very important in light of govt’s flagship schemes to develop infrastructure. Hence, India needs world bank’s support but well researched decision making while applying for loans by analysing the effect of terms and condition towards the national interests is more important. Therefore, India’s dependence on world bank varies from case to case.

 

 


General Studies – 4


 

Topic: Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators;

6. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

“If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.” ― Dalai Lama

Difficulty level: Moderate

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 4 and part of ‘Quotes Wednesdays’ in Mission-2024 Secure.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin the answer by explaining the quote in your own words.

Body:

Explain the importance of compassion and its relationship with happiness – Compassion drives our commitment to serving others with empathy, respect, and dignity. But each of us individually can  practice compassion as we move through the world. Compassion calls us to love our neighbors, and support those who are in need. Cite examples to substantiate.

Conclusion:

Conclude by summarising.

Introduction

Compassion is a deeper level of empathy, demonstrating an actual desire to help the suffering person. It is a unique feeling of sympathy for the suffering of others that involves emotions and empathy towards others, a sense of understanding, and the drive to protect.

Body

Compassion is a virtue that involves Acknowledgment, understanding, and emotional resonance linked with action aimed at understanding the person and the amelioration of suffering

Take for instance the example of Mother Teresa. Mother Teresa was the epitome of compassion. If ever one would dare to give a core competency to her, it is this single characteristic of being a compassionate person. She radiated this quality, when on earth, in a way, few humans could ever do; her love for the marginalized and the vulnerable and particularly for the poorest of the poor and the dying destitute was boundless.

Our compassion for others can lead to alleviation of great distress of people. For example, during the recent migrant crisis, the Bollywood Actor Sonu Sood became quite well known for his help to them on compassionate grounds. Thousands of poor and vulnerable people were given help through him.

Even at personal level, we have to be compassionate to our friends and family. Only then can we share both happiness and their sufferings together. This is the key to be happy.

On an individual level, one must be compassionate about themselves, to be happy in life. For instance, it is important to acknowledge our abilities and not be hard on ourselves when we encounter a failure. As candidates of UPSC, being demotivated and failure is part of the process. This does not mean; we have to believe ill about our capacity and self-loathe. Rather we must overcome that with compassion, trying to empathise with ourselves.

Conclusion

The world desperately stands in need of compassion today. A compassion, which reaches out to the unloved, the ostracized, the marginalized and the vulnerable. A compassion, that takes a stand for the poor, the victims of injustice, the refugees and the displaced. A compassion, that is able to negate and overcome the hate and divisiveness. The humankind must be compassionate to each other to see the world thrive.

 

Topic: Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators;

7. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

“Morality cannot be legislated, but behavior can be regulated. Judicial decrees may not change the heart, but they can restrain the heartless.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

Difficulty level: Tough

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 4 and part of ‘Quotes Wednesdays’ in Mission-2024 Secure.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin the answer by explaining the quote in your own words.

Body:

Explain the difficulties and hindrances in transforming morality in to legislation. Mention how Judicial decrees and legislations may not be enough bring about social change. Cite examples to substantiate.
Next, mention how behaviour can be regulated with right moral values and leading to cultivation of appropriate behaviour. Also, write how decrees can prevent excesses and abuses against the vulnerable.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing about need of having both morality and legislations in consonance.

Introduction

“It is to law alone that men owe justice and liberty. It is this salutary organ of the will of all which establishes in civil rights the natural equality between men. It is this celestial voice which dictates to each citizen the precepts of public reason, and teaches him to act according to the rules” – Rousseau

The above quote says that men need to be civilised through set of laws that impose restrictions on their behaviour. Only then, all men will respect rights of others as well.

Body

Now the other myth that gets around is the idea that legislation cannot really solve the problem and that it has no great role to play in this period of social change because you’ve got to change the heart and you can’t change the heart through legislation. You can’t legislate morals. The job must be done through education and religion.

Certainly, if the problem is to be solved then in the final sense, hearts must be changed. Religion and education must play a great role in changing the heart.

It may be true that the law cannot make a man love another fellow patriot but it can keep him from lynching him and that is important for a civil society. So, there is a need for executive orders. There is a need for judicial decrees. There is a need for civil rights legislation on the local scale within states and on the national scale from the federal government.

The problems of untouchability, female foeticide, crimes against women were all solved thorugh legislation and enforcement. Hence laws, decrees are of urmost importance to bring stability in the life of man as it stands today.

Conclusion

The habits if not the hearts of people have been and are being altered everyday by legislative acts. A vigorous enforcement of civil rights laws can bring an end to injustices which stand as barriers to a truly desegregated society, but it cannot bring an end to the blindness, fear, prejudice, pride and irrationality which stand as barriers to a truly integrated society. Nonetheless laws and decrees are important to attain stable societal life for all men and women.


Join our Official Telegram Channel HERE

Please subscribe to Our podcast channel HERE

Subscribe to our YouTube ChannelHERE

Follow our Twitter Account HERE

Follow our Instagram ID HERE

Follow us on LinkedIn : HERE  



—————————————————-


Source link

National Cyber Security

FREE
VIEW