Info@NationalCyberSecurity
Info@NationalCyberSecurity

Rancho Cordova forum highlights online risks, drug dangers | #childpredator | #onlinepredator | #sextrafficing


The Folsom-Cordova Unified School District held a forum Tuesday night focused on cyber security and drug awareness education for district families as fentanyl remains top of mind for many parents.“We want to inform our parents about different ways that students are prey to online predators and some of the dangers that are out there of illegal drugs on the streets,” said Angela Griffin Ankhelyi, a spokesperson for the district.Det. Christie Hirota of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office Hi-Crimes Task Force presented best practices for keeping children safe online, highlighting some of the applications that are known for attracting predators to their platforms as well as the ways devices and applications can be used to communicate with strangers without parental consent. While stressing no application is inherently bad, she urged parents to be aware of application capabilities and who is using them.Ankhelyi was in agreement with that advice.“Our students are using different channels to communicate electronically with one another and sometimes, predators will take advantage of that to reach our children,” Ankhelyi said. “When we’ve presented this information, parents are thankful but a little shocked.”Justin Long, a parent, attended Tuesday’s session. With two children of his in the district, he said wants to be as informed as possible when it comes to keeping them safe.“There are just so many unknowns,” Long said. “We hear all these stories about fentanyl abuse, about suicide, about cyberbullying. I need to get smart and the more things like this that happen, the more informed we’ll be and the better off we’ll be as parents.Hirota encouraged parents to teach their children to look for red flags, too. For example, she said, someone you don’t know asking to move the conversation to another application or platform can be a sign something concerning may be happening. She stressed that children should not be talking to people they don’t know online and that children may need help understanding if someone is lying about their identity to them.Law enforcement also shared how devastating fentanyl continues to be in Sacramento County. One slide noted the number of pills found to contain fentanyl increased from 622 pills in 2020 to more than 200,000 pills in 2022, according to data presented by the Sacramento County Office of the District Attorney Laboratory of Forensic Service. Supervising criminalist Kristel Suchland said fentanyl continues to be the most concerning drug in communities right now, saying they’ve found it in powder form and dyed in colors as well as mixed in with other drugs such as heroin or cocaine. Suchland said trends right now do not allow for experimentation due to the prevalence of fentanyl.Both Suchland and Hirota stressed how important open and honest communication between parents and their students is for keeping kids safe.

The Folsom-Cordova Unified School District held a forum Tuesday night focused on cyber security and drug awareness education for district families as fentanyl remains top of mind for many parents.

“We want to inform our parents about different ways that students are prey to online predators and some of the dangers that are out there of illegal drugs on the streets,” said Angela Griffin Ankhelyi, a spokesperson for the district.

Det. Christie Hirota of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office Hi-Crimes Task Force presented best practices for keeping children safe online, highlighting some of the applications that are known for attracting predators to their platforms as well as the ways devices and applications can be used to communicate with strangers without parental consent.

While stressing no application is inherently bad, she urged parents to be aware of application capabilities and who is using them.

Ankhelyi was in agreement with that advice.

“Our students are using different channels to communicate electronically with one another and sometimes, predators will take advantage of that to reach our children,” Ankhelyi said. “When we’ve presented this information, parents are thankful but a little shocked.”

Justin Long, a parent, attended Tuesday’s session. With two children of his in the district, he said wants to be as informed as possible when it comes to keeping them safe.

“There are just so many unknowns,” Long said. “We hear all these stories about fentanyl abuse, about suicide, about cyberbullying. I need to get smart and the more things like this that happen, the more informed we’ll be and the better off we’ll be as parents.

Hirota encouraged parents to teach their children to look for red flags, too. For example, she said, someone you don’t know asking to move the conversation to another application or platform can be a sign something concerning may be happening. She stressed that children should not be talking to people they don’t know online and that children may need help understanding if someone is lying about their identity to them.

Law enforcement also shared how devastating fentanyl continues to be in Sacramento County. One slide noted the number of pills found to contain fentanyl increased from 622 pills in 2020 to more than 200,000 pills in 2022, according to data presented by the Sacramento County Office of the District Attorney Laboratory of Forensic Service.

Supervising criminalist Kristel Suchland said fentanyl continues to be the most concerning drug in communities right now, saying they’ve found it in powder form and dyed in colors as well as mixed in with other drugs such as heroin or cocaine. Suchland said trends right now do not allow for experimentation due to the prevalence of fentanyl.

Both Suchland and Hirota stressed how important open and honest communication between parents and their students is for keeping kids safe.



Source link

——————————————————–


Click Here For The Original Source.

National Cyber Security

FREE
VIEW