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School bus cameras to catch stop arm violations in Florida | #schoolsaftey


Just in time for students returning to classes in August, some school districts are equipping their buses with cameras.Similar to red light camera programs, the new devices will be used to catch and ticket drivers who illegally pass buses, threatening student safety.Video shows not one but two cars zooming through a neighborhood just as two students are heading to the school bus.Since last August, Brevard and two other Florida counties have run pilot programs with buses outfitted with cameras from a company called Bus Patrol to see which ones are committing what are called stop arm violations: driving past buses with the stop signs out and red lights flashing. “I know everyone is in a hurry and everyone has a place to go, but really keeping students safe is No. 1 in our book,” Brevard County Schools transportation director Michael Miller said. Miller says the pilot program justifies a new state law that, beginning July 1, will allow every school district in Florida to add cameras.With just 10 buses equipped this recent school year, there were 5,361 violations recorded. That’s 3.8 violations per day. That’s why Brevard County is adding the cameras to all 240 buses.“If people know that they can be fined, we’re hoping that that is going to make them a little bit more cautious and pay more attention to that bus and stop with the sign out,” Miller said. “We are trying to keep the kids as safe as possible.” Under the new state law, the camera will read and record the license plate of a vehicle that passes a school bus in the fully stopped position. The registered owner will be sent a civil citation. The vehicle owner will be fined $225 but receive no points on their license. The law remains, if a law enforcement officer tickets you for a stop arm violation, that fine is $265 and four points on your license. The school districts and the state will use the money to improve transportation safety for students. The Orange County School District is the biggest in the region, carrying more students on more buses for more miles a year. But a spokesperson says for now, there are no plans to outfit its buses with cameras. Another benefit of the program for school districts: The program pays for itself so it won’t be covered by taxpayer dollars. The Osceola County School District, which recently reported a roughly 42% increase in stop arm violations, is expected to add cameras to its buses as well.

Just in time for students returning to classes in August, some school districts are equipping their buses with cameras.

Similar to red light camera programs, the new devices will be used to catch and ticket drivers who illegally pass buses, threatening student safety.

Video shows not one but two cars zooming through a neighborhood just as two students are heading to the school bus.

Since last August, Brevard and two other Florida counties have run pilot programs with buses outfitted with cameras from a company called Bus Patrol to see which ones are committing what are called stop arm violations: driving past buses with the stop signs out and red lights flashing.

“I know everyone is in a hurry and everyone has a place to go, but really keeping students safe is No. 1 in our book,” Brevard County Schools transportation director Michael Miller said.

Miller says the pilot program justifies a new state law that, beginning July 1, will allow every school district in Florida to add cameras.

With just 10 buses equipped this recent school year, there were 5,361 violations recorded. That’s 3.8 violations per day. That’s why Brevard County is adding the cameras to all 240 buses.

“If people know that they can be fined, we’re hoping that that is going to make them a little bit more cautious and pay more attention to that bus and stop with the sign out,” Miller said. “We are trying to keep the kids as safe as possible.”

Under the new state law, the camera will read and record the license plate of a vehicle that passes a school bus in the fully stopped position. The registered owner will be sent a civil citation.

The vehicle owner will be fined $225 but receive no points on their license. The law remains, if a law enforcement officer tickets you for a stop arm violation, that fine is $265 and four points on your license.

The school districts and the state will use the money to improve transportation safety for students.

The Orange County School District is the biggest in the region, carrying more students on more buses for more miles a year. But a spokesperson says for now, there are no plans to outfit its buses with cameras.

Another benefit of the program for school districts: The program pays for itself so it won’t be covered by taxpayer dollars.

The Osceola County School District, which recently reported a roughly 42% increase in stop arm violations, is expected to add cameras to its buses as well.



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