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Tasmania’s inquiry into child sexual abuse finds alleged abusers ‘may still be working’ | #childsafety | #kids | #chldern | #parents | #schoolsafey


Key Points
  • The report made 191 recommendations for child safety reform.
  • The inquiry found from 2000 to 2020 institutions had “too often” failed to adequately respond to allegations and instances of child sexual abuse.
  • The inquiry referred more than 100 people to authorities during investigations, with 34 alleged abusers outlined in the report.
Content warning: This article contains references to child abuse.
People accused of child sexual abuse have not been investigated and may still be working with kids in Tasmania because of the state’s failure to fully review allegations.
The final 3500-page report of a commission of inquiry investigating state responses to abuse allegations was made public on Tuesday.
It detailed failures across the health, education, youth justice and out-of-home care sectors, finding the Ashley Youth Detention Centre had for decades inflicted “systematic” harm and abuse on children.

The report made 191 recommendations for child safety reform, including urgently closing Ashley, which the state government has committed to implementing.

It found “substantial” information about allegations of child sexual abuse at Ashley, gained through redress schemes and civil legal action, had been held by the then-Department of Communities.

Concerns alleged abusers still working with children

Information from the Abuse in State Care Program, which ran from 2003-13, also revealed allegations of abuse against staff and carers in the out-of-home care system.
The report says the information was not acted on, allowing some staff and carers to be responsible for children despite serious allegations having been made against them.

Some of the information relating to Ashley staff was reviewed in late 2020.

Tasmanian Premier Jeremy Rockliff speaks after the release of the report by the ‘Commission of Inquiry into the Tasmanian Government’s Response to Child Sexual Abuse in Institutional Settings’ at Tasmanian Parliament in Hobart. Source: AAP / LOIC LE GUILLY

“(However) there has still not been a comprehensive review of all the information relating to allegations of child sexual abuse held by what is now the Department for Education, Children and Young People,” the report said.

“There has been no reconciliation of information received about people who may be carers in the out-of-home care system or working in other government institutions.

“As a result, we are concerned that there may still be people working with children who are the subject of child sexual abuse allegations who have not been investigated.”

Report refers over 100 people to authorities

The inquiry found from 2000 to 2020 institutions had “too often” failed to adequately respond to allegations and instances of child sexual abuse.
They also failed to act decisively to manage risk and investigate complaints, sometimes due to ignorance or a desire to protect reputations.

The inquiry referred more than 100 people to authorities during investigations, with 34 alleged abusers outlined in the report.

Sections of the report and the identity of alleged perpetrators have been redacted due to legal proceedings.
Tasmanian Premier Jeremy Rockliff on Tuesday announced a new therapeutic youth facility to replace Ashley would be built at Pontville in the state’s south.
He reiterated an apology to survivors, who he said had been failed by a system that should have protected them.
Readers seeking support can contact Lifeline crisis support on 13 11 14, Suicide Call Back Service on 1300 659 467 and Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 (for young people aged 5 to 25). More information is available at and .

Anyone seeking information or support relating to sexual abuse can contact Bravehearts on 1800 272 831 or Blue Knot on 1300 657 380.

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