Info@NationalCyberSecurity
Info@NationalCyberSecurity

The Triad of Challenges and a Glimmer of Hope with Automation | #hacking | #cybersecurity | #infosec | #comptia | #pentest | #ransomware


In a recent survey by Educause, the consequences of budget constraints and market shortages on cybersecurity staffing in higher education and state and local governments have been unveiled, painting a worrisome picture. The survey findings reveal that staffing problems are severely impacting cybersecurity and privacy services, with only a small percentage of organizations able to create new positions and fill existing ones.

The Triad of Challenges

The survey identified three main security issues: cybersecurity budget size, scarcity of cybersecurity skills, and outdated technology. The combination of these factors is making it increasingly difficult for organizations to maintain robust cybersecurity and privacy services.

Public vs Private Sector Struggles

State and local governments are finding it particularly challenging to attract and retain IT staff due to lower salaries compared to the private sector. This disparity is exacerbating the cybersecurity resource gap and making it even harder to provide adequate protection against cyber threats.

A Glimmer of Hope with Automation

Despite these challenges, the survey found that the use of automation tools, such as Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response (SOAR), can be an effective way to address the cybersecurity resource gap. These tools can improve efficiency and productivity, helping organizations to better cope with the current staffing shortages.

As cyber threats continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, it is crucial for higher education and state and local governments to find ways to overcome the current staffing and budget challenges. By investing in automation and prioritizing cybersecurity, these organizations can better protect themselves and their constituents against potential cyber attacks.

For those on the frontlines of this battle, the burden is heavy. Excessive workloads are taking a toll on the mental health and morale of higher education teaching and learning professionals. According to the same Educause survey, 65% of respondents reported an excessive workload, with the most common areas of responsibility being faculty training and development, online or hybrid learning, and instructional design.

Burnout is a real and growing concern among these professionals, with those carrying excessive workloads being more likely to seek other positions within the next year. This revolving door of staff can further exacerbate the cybersecurity resource gap and make it even harder for organizations to keep up with the ever-evolving threat landscape.

To combat this issue, the report recommends prioritizing employee well-being, providing better support for digital literacy, reducing tensions between faculty and instructional staff, and preparing for new teaching methods. By addressing these concerns, higher education institutions can better support their staff and ensure that they are able to provide the highest level of cybersecurity and privacy services.

In today’s interconnected world, cybersecurity is no longer an optional extra – it is a necessity. As such, it is imperative that higher education and state and local governments find ways to overcome the current challenges and ensure that they are able to provide robust cybersecurity and privacy services. By investing in automation and prioritizing employee well-being, these organizations can better protect themselves and their constituents against potential cyber threats.

The clock is ticking, and the stakes have never been higher. The time to act is now.



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