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Vermont Interfaith Action launching new initiative called ‘Safety Together Solution Burlington’ | #childsafety | #kids | #chldern | #parents | #schoolsafey


An idea to create a safer environment in Burlington is being formed by Vermont Interfaith Action.The goal of the project is to build trust between community members and the police.The hope is to create more dialogue so officers can better understand how they can protect residents.Project volunteers said the police suggested they begin with the King Street neighborhood.They said that because of that neighborhood’s diversity.Police also said it’s an area officers aren’t able to focus as much on because of staffing issues. Starting next week, volunteers will be going around the King Street neighborhood, asking community members to fill out surveys related to public safety.“There are questions around child safety, driving safety, and then questions about the police and the relationships between the residents and the police,” said Bill Neal, Vermont Interfaith Action Volunteer. “It’s public safety issues, but it hones in on very specific aspects of daily life.While this is an independent project, Vermont Interfaith Action wanted to get the support from Burlington police to move forward with this initiative.Burlington police Chief Jon Murad, who has seen major staffing issues with his department, said he welcomes the opportunity to receive more data to better understand how the community feels. “We always welcome new data and information,” said Chief Murad. “More is always better than less when it comes to how the community feels or what people in the community are thinking.”Neal said the survey results will help them asses what the main issues are in a particular neighborhood.The goal is to then form a taskforce so they can specifically address those concerns and repeat the process for future neighborhoods. “This will hopefully be the chance to really know the concerns of a particular neighborhood and then the police can become more acquainted with their issues and concerns,” Neal said.Volunteers will be going around the King Street neighborhood next Wednesday (9/27) from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and again the following Saturday (10/7) from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. If interested in volunteering, contact Vermont Interfaith Action Executive Director Debbie Ingram at debbie@viavt.org.

An idea to create a safer environment in Burlington is being formed by Vermont Interfaith Action.

The goal of the project is to build trust between community members and the police.

The hope is to create more dialogue so officers can better understand how they can protect residents.

Project volunteers said the police suggested they begin with the King Street neighborhood.

They said that because of that neighborhood’s diversity.

Police also said it’s an area officers aren’t able to focus as much on because of staffing issues.

Starting next week, volunteers will be going around the King Street neighborhood, asking community members to fill out surveys related to public safety.

“There are questions around child safety, driving safety, and then questions about the police and the relationships between the residents and the police,” said Bill Neal, Vermont Interfaith Action Volunteer. “It’s public safety issues, but it hones in on very specific aspects of daily life.

While this is an independent project, Vermont Interfaith Action wanted to get the support from Burlington police to move forward with this initiative.

Burlington police Chief Jon Murad, who has seen major staffing issues with his department, said he welcomes the opportunity to receive more data to better understand how the community feels.

“We always welcome new data and information,” said Chief Murad. “More is always better than less when it comes to how the community feels or what people in the community are thinking.”

Neal said the survey results will help them asses what the main issues are in a particular neighborhood.

The goal is to then form a taskforce so they can specifically address those concerns and repeat the process for future neighborhoods.

“This will hopefully be the chance to really know the concerns of a particular neighborhood and then the police can become more acquainted with their issues and concerns,” Neal said.

Volunteers will be going around the King Street neighborhood next Wednesday (9/27) from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and again the following Saturday (10/7) from 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

If interested in volunteering, contact Vermont Interfaith Action Executive Director Debbie Ingram at debbie@viavt.org.

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