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Violence at high school football games concern New Yorkers | #schoolsaftey


With her daughter having to flee from a recent public shooting, Malishia Hurd experienced Saturday what many parents fear. 

“She just called me and said, ‘Mom, they’re shooting. I ran into the concession stand,'” Hurd said. “So I’m like, ‘OK, I’m on my way up there.’ Like, I’m nervous. I don’t know what’s going on.”

When she arrived at the school, Hurd waited two hours to be reunited with her daughter. While thankful she’s physically fine, she doesn’t want to chance it happening again.

“So what I’m feeling is scared to let her go to anything else,” Hurd said. “Because this is happening all around the world. It’s not just happening in Utica. It’s happening everywhere.”

The day before, large fights broke out at a high school football game in Buffalo to the point where the game was stopped and several people were arrested.

Hurd believes more safety measures need to be taken at all times.

“Security guards, they can only do but so much,” she said. “So I feel like they need to have revved up security every day, all day, and not wait until something like this happens. To beef it up only for a couple of days and then it goes back to normal.”

The incidents have led to more controversy surrounding the state’s Raise the Age law.

In 2018, New York moved the age of adult criminal responsibility to 18 years old from 16. On Tuesday, state lawmakers said Raise the Age should be modified to clearly define which circumstances juveniles can be held in family court versus criminal court.

“The main premise of Raise the Age was about incarceration,” Oneida County Executive Anthony Picente Jr. said on Tuesday. “Not putting young people in with hardened criminals of older status, older age. It’s not to absolve them of the crimes they’re committing.”

Hurd agrees.

“I don’t think that a 16-year-old with a gun, coming purposely to a game with a gun, should get a slap on the wrist in family court,” she said. “That I don’t because if we keep doing that, they’re gonna keep thinking that they can get a slap on the wrist, and they can come back out and do this again.”

Hurd is grateful Jeff Lynch, the security guard who was shot, is OK, while so many people try to avoid a similar incident.

“It does my heart good to see so many different communities and different agencies trying to do the best that they can,” Hurd said.



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